Recipe to Make Our Braised Ox Cheek Terrine at Home

WH-Chef

Andrew Caulfield, head chef at Waterhead

Often when one is planning what to make for a dinner party, or even just a large family meal, the two main considerations are not being stuck in the kitchen all evening whilst your guests are enjoying themselves and not breaking the bank when it comes to ingredients.

Andrew Caulfield, head chef at Waterhead has come up with the following recipe which would make a perfect starter for any occasion, especially when you are catering for a large number of people.  Not only can the whole dish be prepared well in advance, leaving you time to socialise with your guests, but also the main ingredients, ox cheek and onions, are relatively inexpensive, and make for an incredibly tasty dish.  This recipe makes twelve portions. Continue reading

A Simple Recipe to Create Smoked Salmon at Home

Marc Sanders Head Chef at The Wild Boar Grill & Smokehouse

Marc Sanders Head Chef at The Wild Boar Grill & Smokehouse

As most of our followers have a keen interest in food and many are accomplished cooks, I hope the Chefs of English Lakes can help inspire you to be even more creative and try new recipe ideas.

When we run our smoking courses in conjunction with Jo and Georgina from Smoky Jo’s, the hot Smoked Salmon is always one of the first things our ‘students’ get to taste. A great introduction to smoking food for the first time which can be done without having to buy expensive equipment; just use an old biscuit tin or a deep metal tray with a cooling rack covered with tin foil. We use a Cameron stove top smoker which can easily be purchased from good garden centres or online. It is  very important that the sawdust you use for smoking food does not contain any oil that may have come from a chainsaw. Oak is one of the most popular sawdust’s used for smoking. Continue reading

Beef Daube Recipe from Lancaster House Head Chef

Damien Ng shows us how to make a great value winter favourite

I have always been of the opinion that when it comes to planning a great meal, sometimes its best to look to the past rather than trying to re-invent the wheel. Every chef boasts about their “own interpretations” or “contemporary twists” on dishes. But for me personally, you’d be hard pressed to beat a true classic that’s been around for generations. Something your Gran might have made. Something that evokes warm, childhood memories of happy times at the family dinner table.

With this is mind, here’s a dish we’ve reincarnated recently at Lancaster House, and what’s more, it’s incredibly easy and also relatively cheap to make.

Beef Daube in a Guinness & Red Wine Stew and “Real” Dumplings (For 2)

Ingredients

For the Stew For the Dumplings
  • 2 Beef Daubes diced into 1½ cm cubes
  • 1 Large Diced Onion
  • 1 Small Swede & 2 carrots cut into 1cm cubes
  • 2 celery sticks (roughly chopped)
  • 3 Tbsp of Worcestershire Sauce
  • 2 glasses of red wine
  • 2 cans of Guinness or stout
  • 25g Fresh Thyme (finely chopped)
  • ½ bulb of garlic (crushed)
  • Beef-based Thickening agent
  • 4½ oz of Self Raising Flour
  • 1½ oz of Beef Suet
  • ¼ tspn of Salt
  • 1 tbsp of Chopped Parsley
  • ½ tbsp of Fresh Thyme
  • 2 Cloves of Garlic
  • 3½ fl/oz of water

Method

  1. Place all the ingredients (except the thickening agent) for the stew in a deep sauté or good non-stick saucepan
  2. Add the red wine and the Guinness and make sure there is enough to cover all the ingredients, bearing in mind some of the liquid will evaporate during cooking. If you need to add more wine, then feel free to do so. (You can never have too much of a good thing I say!)
  3. Bring the pan to boil. Once it’s reached boiling, turn the heat down and let it simmer for at least 1 hour, or until the meat is tender.
  4. For the dumplings, place all your carefully weighed out ingredients (except the water) into a bowl and make a “well” in the middle of it. Now add the water and mix with your hands to make into a nice soft, spongy dough.
  5. Clean and dry your hands thoroughly. Now add a little flour to cover the inside of your hands and roll out 6 balls of the dough mixture into round dumplings
  6. As soon as the meat is tender, start adding some of your thickening agent (Bisto is good). But don’t thicken it too much as you don’t want it to burn after you’ve added your dumplings
  7. Now, the most important part. Season with Salt & Pepper (to your own liking) and add the dumplings to the pan and keep on a low heat for another 15-20 minutes. The dumplings should rise a little.
  8. Serve into a bowl accompanied with your favourite vegetables. I’d go for some nice creamy mash and green beans. Hope you’ve also saved a little red wine to accompany your meal